Seeing the classics in colour

January 19, 2018

Modern technology has revealed an irrefutable, if unpopular, truth: many of the statues, reliefs, and sarcophagi created in the ancient Western world were in fact painted. Marble was a precious material for Greco-Roman artisans, but it was considered a canvas, not the finished product for sculpture. It was carefully selected and then often painted in gold, red, green, black, white, and brown, among other colors.

Seeing the classics in colour
Large polychrome tauroctony relief of Mithras killing a bull, originally from the mithraeum of S. Stefano Rotonodo (end of 3rd century CE), now at the Baths of Diocletian Museum, Rome (photo by Carole Raddato/Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0)
Seeing the classics in colour
A reconstruction in bronze of the head of a young athlete shows he has been crowned with the fillet of a victor. Based on an original dating from the early 1st century A.D., the head was found in Naples in the 1700s as part of a complete figure. Reportedly
Seeing the classics in colour
The Archer from the western pediment of the Temple of Aphaia on Aigina, reconstruction, color variant A from the Gods of Color exhibit (photo by Marsyas/Wikimedia, CC BY-SA 2.5)
Seeing the classics in colour

https://hyperallergic.com/383776/why-we-need-to-start-seeing-the-classical-world-in-color/

If seeing this has inspired you to learn more about purchasing coloured diamonds or commissioning coloured diamond jewellery, please visit www.yvesfreydiamonds.com to arrange a personal consultation with Yves.